Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Tuesday, 31 October 2017

Happy Samhain

Happy Samhain everyone!

Once every people in the world believed that trees were divine, and could take a human or grotesque shape and dance among the shadows; and that deer, and ravens and foxes, and wolves and bears, and clouds and pools, almost all things under the sun and moon, and the sun and moon, were not less divine and changeable. They saw in the rainbow the still bent bow of a god thrown down in his negligence; they heard in the thunder the sound of his beaten water-jar, or the tumult of his chariot wheels; and when a sudden flight of wild duck, or of crows, passed over their heads, they thought they were gazing at the dead hastening to their rest; while they dreamed of so great a mystery in little things that they believed the waving of a hand, or of a sacred bough, enough to trouble far-off hearts, or hood the moon with darkness.
W B Yeats (1865 - 1939) 

Thursday, 24 August 2017

The other Inclusive Wicca

Please note that there is another tradition in Australia called Inclusive Wicca, run by Amethyst Treleven. The founding coven of this tradition is the Circle of Oak and Mistletoe.

The inclusive Wicca tendency in Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wicca has no links with the Inclusive Wicca Tradition, though I am sure they are very nice people.

Their use of the term inclusive refers to the way they include ideas from many different traditions and ethnicities, and adapt the rituals for individuals. I could not find any mention of adapting rituals for LGBTQIA people (though it is possible that they also do this).

Monday, 21 August 2017

The time has come

Inspired by the stance of the amazing John Shelby Spong, I will no longer debate with people who want Wicca to be exclusive and excluding.

I will no longer engage with the bigoted view that tradition is unchanging and unchangeable, or that the Book of Shadows demands only male/female interactions in Wicca.

I will no longer debate with people who think that Wicca is solely duotheist, or that it is a "fertility religion", or that its practices should remain exclusive, or that it cannot be modified and expanded.

If you are intent on creating a version of Wicca that rigidly adheres to outdated 1950s notions of gender, form your own tradition.

If you cannot cope with Wicca including people with a different understanding of what is "core" to our practice, form your own tradition.

Too many people have already left heterocentric "mainstream" Wicca because they felt excluded. That is not good enough.

The world has moved on, leaving behind those elements of the Craft that cannot adjust to new knowledge or a new understanding.

There is no middle ground between prejudice and oppression. Justice delayed is justice denied.

The first same-sex initiation took place around a quarter of a century ago. People have been developing more inclusive practices for decades. Deal with it.






Friday, 18 August 2017

Statement condemning racism

Inclusive Wicca completely rejects racism, fascism, Nazism, white supremacism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, ageism, ableism, body-shaming, and all forms of bigotry. 

Inclusive Wiccans celebrate life and love in all its beauty and diversity, and seek to protect and preserve the Earth and Nature, and to cultivate virtues of compassion and respect for all life. 

For this reason, following the recent events in Charlottesville, USA, we utterly condemn the ideology and actions of the white supremacists and Neo-Nazis who have caused such suffering there.

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Folk heroes of the resistance


What do Anansi, Raven, Coyote, Pérák, Aradia, the Golem of Prague, Robin Hood, Wild Edric, and Ned Ludd have in common? They are all folk heroes of resistance to tyranny, oppression, slavery, and fascism.

It’s Folklore Thursday today on Twitter, and the thoughts of several contributors have turned to folk heroes who resisted tyranny and fascism. It started with Christian Read’s tweet about Pérák, and continued with contributions from me, Sarah Rance-Riley, Austin Hackney, Creative Histories, and Folklore Film Fest.

Continue reading on Dowsing for Divinity